Category Archives: Development

Qadri encourages Business Improvement Area for Stittsville Main

(via Councillor Shad Qadri)

On Monday, November 21st, I was pleased to attend the Stittsville Village Association event, “Reinventing Stittsville Main Street”. The discussion focused on potential business growth in the heart of our community and raised some insightful discussion amongst business owners, landowners and residents in the area. Continue reading


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COMMENT: Opportunity, momentum and passion for a revitalized Stittsville Main

About 45 people packed into Quitters on Monday night to take part in a panel discussion called Re-Inventing Stittsville Main.
I organized the event along with the Stittsville Village Association, the West Ottawa Board of Trade and Rick Tremblay from Quitters, with a goal of starting a conversation about the future of Stittsville Main. Continue reading


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Tree cutting starts Monday for Minto’s Potter’s Key

(via Councillor Shad Qadri)

I would like to take a moment to provide a quick update on the tree cutting in Potter’s Key.

Today, the contractors have received their final required permits to undertake these works. As such, tree cutting will commence on Monday, November 21st and is expected to be completed before Christmas. Continue reading


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NOV 21: Re-Inventing Stittsville Main

“An event to bring together entrepreneurs, landowners, investors, and interested stakeholders from the community, to begin a conversation about the future of Stittsville Main.”
 
Presented by Stittsville Village Association (SVA), West Ottawa Board of Trade, Quitters Coffee, StittsvilleCentral.ca
Free admission, registration requiredClick here to register
U
PDATE: Pre-registration is full! We will be webcasting this event, watch for the link coming soon.
 
Panelists:
– Rick Tremblay (Quitters)
– Alan Whitten (Huntington Properties)
– Sherry Beadle (City of Ottawa economic development office)
– David Nash (Mayor of Merrickville/Wolford)
 
 
Agenda:
7pm – registration + meet & greet
7.30pm – panel discussion
9:00pm – wrap
 
For more information please email stittsvillevillage@gmail.com
 

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UPDATE: Flewellyn-Jones house project seeks re-zoning

(ABOVE: Flewellyn-Jones House, November 2013.)

Last January, City Council approved heritage designation for the Flewellyn-Jones House on Fernbank Road, just east of the Shea Road roundabout. I noticed that a lot of the brush and overgrowth had been cleared away from the property recently and I was curious about the status of the redevelopment plans. Continue reading


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Car dealership proposed for Hazeldean Road at Sweetnam

The City of Ottawa has received a site plan control application to build an automotive dealership at 5835 Hazeldean Road.

The property is located on the north side of Hazeldean, across from Sweetnam Drive. It’s sandwiched between Poole Creek to the east, and Fringewood North to the west. The land is currently being used as a large parking/storage area for the Canadian Auto Mall dealership. Continue reading


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Stittsville South construction resumes, and that means more blasting

After a few months of delay because of missing permits, construction is proceeding south of the Westwind community in what’s known as Stittsville South.

That construction involves a lot of loud, foundation-shaking blasting, and Councillor Shad Qadri provided an update – and admonishment – about the plans in his newsletter on Friday. Continue reading


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LINKED: New DND move to west end impacts “CFB Fairwinds”

Over the next few years, thousands of employees at the Department of National Defence will move into the old Nortel buildings on Moodie Drive. The Ottawa Citizen ran a feature this weekend called “The rise of Pentagon North: How Ottawa’s new DND headquarters will change this city”.

It looks at the impact of the move on things like real estate and transportation.  Here’s an excerpt:

For many in DND, especially those with younger children, this translates into a fondness for newer developments such as those sprouting up around the Canadian Tire Centre hockey stadium. Four of Scott’s clients have recently bought homes in the Stittsville area. He said one subdivision, Fairwinds, has become so popular with DND employees, some are calling it “CFB Fairwinds.” (Short for Canadian Forces Base).

Scott’s experience suggests the shift to the west in real estate is already underway. If Ottawa’s new light rail project eventually extends past the Bayshore Shopping Centre into Kanata, the trend could well accelerate.


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NOTEBOOK: Revised site plan approved for Stittsville Walk

(FILE PHOTO: Unfinished “Stittsville Walk” condos, March 6, 2016.)

“I suppose the best one can say is that it is no worse than the original proposal.”

That’s the reaction I received today from a long-time Stittsville resident who’s been following the progress — or lack thereof — of the Stittsville Walk condo development at 1491 Stittsville Main Street.  The project has been stalled since late 2013, and only one of the six blocks was ever built.  It remains unoccupied. Continue reading


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HODGINS HOUSE: They paved paradise, put up a Mattress Mart

“IN LESS THAN 24 HOURS IT WAS GONE,” wrote reporter Debbie Lawes in the Kanata Standard on Wednesday, June 8, 1988, a week after a wrecking crew tore down Hodgins House at the corner of Hazeldean Road and Terry Fox, to make way for a shopping plaza.

It was an unexpected and bitter end to a two-year effort by local residents to save the historic building, a stone mansion built in 1881 by William T. Hodgins, a Member of Parliament from 1891-1900 and one of the most influential landowners in the area in his day.

Here’s the story of the house, and how the community tried – and failed – to save it.

Continue reading


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Grocery store, restaurant proposed for corner of Fernbank and Shea

Map of the proposed development at 5960 Fernbank Road. Shea runs from left to right across the top of the map, and Fernbank runs from top to bottom. The proposed grocery store is the large block at the bottom left. (Click map for larger size.)
Map of the proposed development at 5960 Fernbank Road. Shea runs from left to right across the top of the map, and Fernbank runs from top to bottom. The proposed grocery store is the large block at the bottom left. (Click map for larger size.)

 

The City of Ottawa has received a request to amend the zoning by-law to allow a commercial development at the south west corner of Fernbank and Shea.  The land is currently Rural Countryside Zone (RU), and the proposal seeks to change that to General Mixed Use Zone (GM)

The proposed development would include a grocery store, restaurant and retail stores at 5960 Fernbank Road. All of those uses fall within “General Mixed Use”, and since the land is part of the general urban area the rezoning will likely be approved.

The land is former farmland, and has been owned by William “Bill” Davidson since 1975.  Davidson now lives in Pakenham but grew up on the farm. Planning documents refer to the land as “Clydesdale Meadows”.

Continue reading


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Blanding’s Turtle habitat to be affected by Potter’s Key development

(File photo: Blanding’s Turtle along Hazeldean Road.  Photo by Ken McRae.)

Minto is proposing several measures to protect Blanding’s Turtles at the new Potter’s Key development on Hazeldean Road. They’ve applied to Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) for permission to proceed with the development, which could impact the animals, classified as a Species at Risk in Ontario (SARO). Continue reading


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BUILT UP: Increasing density both a positive and a challenge

(Photo: Aerial photo of Fairwinds. Photo by @TwitchxB)

With a couple of proposals for low-rise apartment buildings along Robert Grant (Haliburton Heights, Livery Street), and a multi-story retirement complex along Hazeldean (Wellings), we wanted to find out what Stittsville could look like with more high-density developments. Continue reading


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THIS OLD HOUSE: Lytle family puts Stittsville Main Street home up for sale

(ABOVE: Cathy Lytle stands in front of her family’s home at 1495 Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Devyn Barrie.)

After more than a century on Stittsville Main Street, the Lytle House is up for sale.  The asking price is $499,000 according to Brent Taylor of Brentcom Realty. “Redevelopment ideal for retail, service commercial, office, residential and institutional uses, including mixed-use buildings, and excluding auto-related uses,” says the listing.

It’s a large lot, 100 feet along the street and 160 feet deep.

Cathy Lytle says the house has been standing since at least 1900, and it’s been in her family for 64 years. While it doesn’t have a heritage designation, it is on the city’s heritage registry. That doesn’t give it any protection, but if a future owner applies to demolish it, the City could do a review that could lead to full heritage designation.


DEVYN BARRIE: What can you tell me about the history of the house?

CATHY LYTLE: It was built in 1900 from a bachelor and it was sold four years later to a young couple… he was a tinkerer and they raised their daughter, Evelyn. She took cancer and died and then the father died of old age and the mother died after she sold the house to my parents… she lived with my parents for five years, she had herself written into the deed, for one bedroom and three meals a day and they got along fine, until she passed away.


Ab & Gwen Lytle's house, 1976. Photo from the Goulbourn Township Historical Society archives via Lesley McKay.
Ab & Gwen Lytle’s house, 1976. Photo from the Goulbourn Township Historical Society archives via Lesley McKay.

 

DB: It must have been something to grow up here and watch the town change all around it, hey?

CL: It’s not the [same] town anymore. Doesn’t matter which window you look out, it’s not the same at all. It’s funny, we were just saying I can remember all the places we used to go and play and climb trees and whose farmer fields we used to run through. And I said, now people look at you and say “well no, there was something else” or “No, no that was just all field.”

But yeah, [there have] been changes, it’s been hard on some of the older ones to see some of the changes.

DB: What’s it been like for you?

CL: I’m okay with some of the change, I just don’t like people coming in and telling me how to live. They want certain things changed here… but you’re taking away the essence of a small town.

DB: Why sell the house?

CL: Oh, we can’t afford to keep everything up. [My mother is] 87, she’s not well. My dad was a small contracting excavator, he left her a little bit of money, she was only on old age pension, she can only do so much. I only work part time and I work a minimum wage job… I can’t afford it. So, we decided to go to something that we both can manage and enjoy.

Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.
Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.

DB: How does it feel to have to leave this house behind?

CL: I’m okay. I’m ready. And I think she’s ready too. She’s had [a longer time] here, she’s raised her family and I was born here. We’re all business and everybody else has gone out and done better, this will help pay for some medical bills coming down the road…

… It’ll be sad in a way, but we have our memories, we have our pictures and they can’t take that away from us.

DB: Any idea what might happen to the house if it does get sold?

CL: We’ve had a business here for 40 years, like everybody else on Main Street. They had their house and their business right there. Last 20 years my dad’s been dead and we got rid of the business, so it’s kinda nice to think that somebody else will come in and make a go of it… maybe put something in like an ice cream store or something that reflects the core, not an office building or something. But it’s up to them.

DB: What do you think about the state of Main Street in general today?

CL: Well, when I grew up there was no sidewalks. It was a main highway… the traffic was heavy but now… you can’t sit outside, it’s hard to hear outside, the dust picks up, people come in on either side of you… it’s changed a lot compared to what I used to play, run and climb every tree in this place. It was a lot different… I watch the kids over in the park, but it’s not the same. We used to like the trains coming in and watching the people and wave, you don’t do that anymore. You can’t, there’s nothing there. And these people who are using the park don’t understand what was really there and I think they would have enjoyed it a lot better.

This interview was originally heard on Stittsvegas. Click here to listen to the full interview…

Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.
Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.

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