Category Archives: Garbage & Recycling

Skip the trash and donate your used furniture to Matthew House

(PHOTO: Volunteers move and sort donated furniture in the Matthew House warehouse.)

KEY FACTS:

  • Matthew House collects usable furniture for re-distribution to the marginalized Ottawa community, helping over 600 local families each year.
  • Items currently in demand include tables, chairs, couches, pantries, bed frames, mattresses, bed linens, small kitchen appliances, kitchenware, and any other object that is considered a basic household necessity.

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As you drive along the beautiful roads of Stittsville each morning, one can’t help but notice how lucky we are. Homes with perfectly manicured lawns, neighbours waving to you as they complete a morning stroll, coffee shops welcoming you with delicious smells that pass by your nose at the perfect time, and (on the occasional day this year) a picture perfect sunrise that excites you for the following weekend. Continue reading


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Hidden treasures can be found in this week’s Spring Giveaway Weekend

(via City of Ottawa)

The old adage, “one person’s throwaway could be another person’s treasure,” holds true during the Spring Giveaway Weekend, which takes place this Saturday, June 10 and Sunday, June 11.

So don’t put your unwanted stuff in the garbage — set it out at the curb on Giveaway Weekend. Also, tour around your neighbourhood, community and city to possibly find your own hidden treasure. Continue reading


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LINKED: Waste Management scraps plan to accept Quebec garbage

CBC reports today that Waste Management is backing away from its plans to accept Quebec waste at the Carp Road landfill facility:

A proposal to allow construction waste from Quebec to be dumped at a processing facility in Carp has been trashed.

Waste Management Canada had sought and won approval from Ontario’s Environmental Review Tribunal on March 1 to transfer construction and demolition waste from western Quebec to the Ottawa processing and recycling facility at 2301 Carp Rd.

The city announced last week it planned to appeal the decision.

But on Monday Waste Management said after talking with city officials, the company is backing away from the plan.

“After discussing the matter with the city and the ministry, we have decided not to proceed with our proposal to include portions of Quebec within the service area for the West Carleton Environmental Centre and … we will as soon as practicable take such steps as are necessary to amend the [Environmental Compliance Approval] accordingly,” said spokesperson Wayne French in a letter to city councillors and community stakeholders.

During public consultations on the plan last year, members of the public raised concerns about increased truck traffic flowing over the bridge into Ottawa, and worried Ottawa could become a dumping ground for other regions.

Read the full story…


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UPDATE: Waste Management “taking steps to review” Quebec garbage application

The City of Ottawa’s communications department sent this memo from City solicitor Rick O’Connor to media outlets today.

Today was the deadline to request an appeal to the Ministry of Environment’s decision to allow Waste Management to accept Quebec garbage at the Carp Road landfill facility.  The City of Ottawa, along with seven residents and community groups, each submitted a request for leave to appeal the decision.  Now it’s in the hands of the Environmental Review Tribunal to decide if an appeal can go forward.

O’Connor also shared a letter the City received from Waste Management, who runs the landfill facility, where they state that they are “taking steps to review its position”. A copy of the letter is included below. Continue reading


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UPDATE: City will appeal MOE decision on Carp landfill service area

City of Ottawa solicitor Rick O’Connor recommended that city staff appeal a Ministry of Environment decision to allow the Carp landfill to accept waste from Western Quebec.

The memo was circulated to media outlets yesterday, and Councillor Shad Qadri confirmed on Facebook that the city would be moving forward with an appeal.

“…for leave to be obtained, it is only necessary that a preliminary review of the evidence shows that the decision is unreasonable and that significant harm to the environment could result. Therefore, in light of the City’s longstanding position on limiting the geographic area from which waste is brought to Ottawa landfills, it is my view that it would be appropriate to seek leave to appeal the MOECC’s decision in this instance,” he wrote.


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Early birds can register now for GLAD Cleaning the Capital

(press release via City of Ottawa)

The City of Ottawa is pleased to announce the annual GLAD Cleaning the Capital campaign will take place from April 15 to May 15. Early-bird registration is now available.

Registration is quick and easy:

  • Go to ottawa.ca/clean, or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401) to register for the cleanup. The interactive map on our website will show you which locations have already been claimed, allow you to register your own project site and choose the cleanup supplies that you need.
  • Select a location such as a park, ravine, shoreline, bus stop, pathway or any public area that requires litter pickup or graffiti removal.

Win prizes

Volunteers who register their cleanup project before April 14 have a chance to win one of many early bird prizes donated by our generous sponsors. Volunteers who submit a final cleanup report by May 31 will be eligible for more prizes.

GLAD Cleaning the Capital is a city-wide event that brings together neighbours, communities and friends to help keep Ottawa clean and green! Last year alone, 72,000 volunteers collected more than 58,182 kilograms of litter from 1,300 projects.

This is a great opportunity for families and friends to work together on community cleanup projects that help make Ottawa clean, green, graffiti-free and litter-free. Cleaning the Capital is also an excellent way for high school students to earn their community volunteer hours.

For more information on City programs and services, visit ottawa.ca or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401).  You can also connect with us through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


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Carp landfill facility gets ok for Quebec garbage, despite City’s objections

As Lando said in the Empire Strikes Back…

You might remember hearing back in September that Waste Management applied to the Ontario Ministry of the Environment for permission to bring construction and demolition waste from Quebec to the landfill facility on Carp Road. Continue reading


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NOTEBOOK: Landfill proposal could mean even more downtown trucks

A number of people have asked me this summer about the status of the Carp Road landfill expansion, or as Waste Management (WM) would prefer us to call it, the West Carleton Environmental Centre (WCEC).  

The only development is that last month, Waste Management asked the Ontario Ministry of the Environment for permission to import construction and demolition waste (known as “C&D”) from Gatineau to the current Carp Road facility.  You can read the application here…

The idea is to take the waste material and recover any recyclable materials before shipping the rest to a landfill.  Ross Wallace, a spokesperson for Waste Management, tells me that they want to be on a level playing field with other waste and recycling businesses that are allowed to take C&D waste from Western Quebec.

This brings to mind two concerns:

1) Truck traffic.  Every load of garbage coming from Gatineau to Carp Road will be crossing bridges over the Ottawa River and using downtown streets. The timing of this proposal is ironic given that City Councillors are currently reviewing a $2-billion tunnel plan to reduce the number of trucks that cut through the core and choke up King Edward Avenue.

2) Waste transfer and jurisdictions. When WM first applied to expand the current landfill, it committed to serve Ottawa and close western neighbours like Lanark County.  Opening the door – even slightly – to garbage from Quebec is worrisome.  It contradicts the business model proposed by WM in the approved Environmental Assessment and Environmental Compliance Approval, where only Ontario waste was considered.

Environmentalists and waste industry watchers have been saying for a while now that increasing capacity at Ontario landfills (like the one on Carp Road) would lead to importing waste from farther and farther away. Do we really want our City to be the destination for garbage from other provinces or even the United States?

As Lando said in the Empire Strikes Back, “This deal is getting worse all the time!” The expanded landfill is going to look way different from what WM first described when they started the approval process: we’re hearing there’s no recreational land until the landfill is closed, recycling capability will be drastically reduced, and now they’re asking to expand the collection boundaries.

Residents can comment on WM’s application until October 3, either online or by mail.  Here’s how to get in touch.

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The next update to watch for is what’s happening with the Host Municipal Responsibility Agreement (HMRA). That’s the legal agreement between WM and the City that sets terms and conditions for the landfill’s operation. The company has been negotiating with the City’s lawyers, and at some point the agreement will need council approval. It’s not clear how (or even if) the public will be able to give any input.


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Early birds can register now for Cleaning the Capital

(via City of Ottawa)

The City of Ottawa and Tim Hortons are pleased to announce the annual Tim Hortons Cleaning the Capital campaign, which will take place from April 15 to May 15. Early-bird registration is now available.

Registration is quick and easy:

  • Go to ottawa.ca, or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401) to register for the cleanup. The interactive map on our website will show you which locations have already been claimed, allow you to register your own project site and choose the cleanup supplies that you need.
  • Select a location such as a park, ravine, shoreline, bus stop, pathway or any public area that requires litter pickup or graffiti removal.

Continue reading


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COLA: Put the “public” back in landfill Public Liaison Committee

As one of the conditions for operating the expanded Carp Road Landfill, Waste Management had to establish a Public Liaison Committee (PLC) to “provide a forum for public concerns to be raised and for mitigation measures to be discussed where appropriate”.

We’re beginning to find out how inadequately the PLC is meeting those goals.

The PLC was established in 2014 and had its first meeting in June that year. It has 12 voting members, including two members from Waste Management, five City of Ottawa councillors from neighbouring wards, three residents and two members of the local business community.

Here are some of our concerns about the committee:

  1. Public” Liaison Committee meetings are closed to the public!
    COLA asked if a representative could sit in on future PLC meetings as an observer. Councillor El-Chantiry, the PLC’s chair, responded that meetings are not open to the public. Under the terms of reference, PLC members who speak to the communitymust ensure their views reflect the consensus of the PLC. We were told that we can’t attend, because we might hear dissenting views around the table. Contrast that to Waste Management’s Twin Creeks landfill in Southwestern Ontario: PLC meetings there are completely open to the public. Anyone can request to make verbal presentations of up to 15 minutes. Only confidential matters are dealt with in-camera.
  2. The PLC’s terms of reference muzzle city councillors.
    The terms of reference state: “Members who speak to the community must ensure that the views and information shared are that which reflects the consensus view of the PLC.” Effectively, that means that councillors can’t freely express a point of view that contradicts the consensus of the PLC, whatever that may be. We think that councillors should be free to speak their mind on ALL matters relating to the landfill.
  3. The criteria for PLC public members is unclear
    The resident and business members of the PLC were selected in 2014 by local councillors after a rather poorly advertised application process. Details of the selection and biographies of the selected candidates have never been made available to the public they represent. The terms of reference don’t define criteria for selecting members, nor are there any guidelines for how long they can serve for.
  4. The PLC web site is inadequate.
    The PLC is required to have a website providing email contact information, functionality to receive and reply to comments from the public, and publish notices of meetings and minutes. What’s there now is a bare bones web page that fails to address most of these requirements. There is no email posted to contact the PLC, there are no bios of the members, no dates for upcoming meetings, and minutes are often not published until months after a meeting has occurred. (You can visit the web page here: http://wcec.wm.com/wcecplc.asp.)

COLA (Coalition for Landfill Accountability) represents eleven local community associations, with a mandate to educate people on the landfill and encourage public engagement in the development process. As well, COLA wants to ensure that all commitments made during the approval process are carried out.

COLA believes that the PLC must:

  • open meetings to the public
  • ensure greater transparency and communications
  • clarify terms of reference around the selection of public members
  • update its terms of reference to allow all members – especially councillors – to speak freely on all issues relating to the Carp Road Landfill

 

Tanya Hein is president of the Stittsville Village Association, one of the members groups of COLA.)


 

We welcome letters to the editor and guest columns. They can be sent to feedback@stittsvillecentral.ca. All letters are subject to editing for length or clarity. Letters must include the writer’s name and a daytime phone number for confirmation.


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Waste Management gets Environmental Compliance Approval for expanded landfill

Waste Management has passed one of the last regulatory hurdles required to move ahead with the expansion of the Carp Road landfill.

Ross Wallace, a company official, sent an email to stakeholders today to inform that that the Ministry of the Environment and Climiate Change has granted an Environmental Compliance Approval for the site. Continue reading


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Community groups ask for role in landfill negotiations

(Press release from COLA.)

COLA (Coalition for Landfill Accountability) wants the City of Ottawa to engage in real and meaningful consultation with residents during the negotiations of the Host Municipal Responsibility Agreement (HMRA) for the Carp Road landfill expansion.

The HMRA is being negotiated between the City and Waste Management (WM) behind closed doors, with no community engagement. This lack of transparency is unacceptable.

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BACKGROUND: The Site Plan Control for Waste Management’s Carp Road landfill expansion (or “West Carleton Environmental Centre”) was approved by the City on October 28, 2015. One of the conditions of approval is that Waste Management enter into a HMRA with the City. The HMRA is supposed to address a number of community concerns including:

  • Community compensation
  • Odour management
  • Property value protection
  • Groundwater safety
  • Traffic
  • Transparency

This is similar to the process in 2001, when the City of Ottawa and WM negotiated in secret, and came up with an agreement that left much to be desired:

  • It did not include property value protection for neighbouring residents and businesses.
  • The negotiated “cost-per-tonne” levy was only $1 per tonne. (Recently- negotiated agreements in Southern Ontario have been set at $6 per tonne.) This represents significant revenue to the City given that the proposed landfill can accept up to 400,000 tonnes of garbage per year.
  • Community compensation included an additional $60,000 per year to support “environmental initiatives and local projects” in nearby wards. Projects funded by the community compensation were selected by WM and west end city councillors, again behind closed doors. The community had no input into where that money was spent.

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OUR REQUEST: COLA is asking the City of Ottawa and Waste Management to consult and include residents and community associations in the negotiation process now, instead of after a draft is completed. Community input and engagement in the HMRA is vital to the development of a fair and effective agreement that benefits citizens.

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Coalition for Landfill Accountability (COLA) is a group of residents and community associations in West Carleton, Stittsville and Kanata who are concerned about the proposed expansion of the Carp Road Landfill and its future impact on the community. Member associations include:
• Stittsville Village Association
• Huntley Manor Community Association
• Richardson Corridor Community Association
• Crossing Bridge Community Association
• Fairwinds Community Association
• Jackson Trails Community Association
• Southwest Stittsville Community Association
• Ward 5 Citizens Council
• Kanata Beaverbrook Community Association


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LETTER: We Day highlights teen’s fight against the Carp Road landfill

Olivia Nixon and her daughter Maddy Moffatt at the Stittsville Village Fest in 2012.
Olivia Nixon and her daughter Maddy Moffatt at the Stittsville Villagefest in 2012.

 

At the recent “We Day” in Ottawa, where 16,000 young people gathered to celebrate how youth are making a difference in their local and global communities, my daughter Maddy Moffatt received a “shout out” at the event. Continue reading


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COLA group launches new website

COLA web site screen shot

The Coalition for Landfill Accountability (COLA) launched a new web site today at colaottawa.ca.  The web site will be a resource for residents to learn about issues related to the expansion of the Carp Road landfill.

COLA is a group of nine community associations in Kanata, West Carleton and Stittsville.  The group’s members include the Stittsville Village Association, and residents groups from Crossing Bridge, Fairwinds, Jackson Trails and Southwest Stittsville.

In late October, the City of Ottawa approved Waste Management’s site plan application for the landfill.  The next step in the municipal approval process is to finalize Host Community Agreement that covers things like property value protection, traffic, and community compensation.

Waste Management still needs Environmental Compliance Approval from the Ontario Ministry of Environment before they can start operations.


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Four things to do with your pumpkin, post-Halloween

1. Bring it to Stittsville’s 3rd annual Pumpkin Parade of course! Organizer Trevor Eggleton is expecting to have hundreds of creative jack-o-lanterns on display at Village Square Park from 6:00pm-7:30pm. Enter your own masterpiece to win a prize in one of three categories (child, teen and adult), or just come to marvel at all the creative designs.  Includes prizes from Tracy’s Art Studio, Pottery Playhouse, the Ottawa Senators’, Brown’s Your Independent Grocer, Saoirse Esthetics, The Glen Pub, and Covered Bridge Brewing, plus free hot chocolate and a visit from Mayor Watson.  Best of all, there will be compost bins on site so you won’t have to take your pumpkin home with you.

2. Feed it to the chickens. Rebecca Handbridge lives near Stittsville and uses pumpkins – whole or carved – as a supplement for her flock of chickens.  She’ll pick up whole or carved pumpkins, as well as compostable straw and ha bales that you may have left over from your Halloween decor.  She has 80 laying hens and says that she goes through a lot of pumpkins in the winter.
UPDATE: Handbridge says she’s been inundated with requests for pumpkin pick-ups from all over Ottawa. If you’d like to help feed her chickens, you can drop them off at the gate at 6619 Franktown Road.

3. Launch your pumpkin from a giant slingshot.  For $5/pumpkin ($20 for 5 pumpkins) you can launch your gourd to raise money for the Ottawa Chapter of Cystic Fibrosis Canada. It happens from 10am-2pm at 5740 Old Richmond Road near Fallowfield. More info here.

4. Compost it.  You can put your jack-o-lantern out with green bin on garbage day.


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Responsible Dog Owners of Canada plan poop clean-up Oct 10

The Responsible Dog Owners of Canada are planning a fall clean-up along the Trans Canada Trail on Abbott Street, near the “unofficial dog park” on October 10.

The clean-up happens from 9:00am-11:00am. Bags and gloves will be handed out to dog owners. The reward is a much cleaner park and dog cookies will be provided.

For more information visit www.responsibledogowners.ca.


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Residents push for landfill accountability

EDITOR’S NOTE: StittsvilleCentral.ca is lending our support to a new community initiative called the Coalition for Landfill Accountability (COLA).  

It’s a group made up of residents and community associations who have concerns about the proposed expansion of the Carp Road Landfill.  

They’ve launched a web site, Twitter feed and Facebook page, and they are hoping to re-engage people in Stittsville, West Carleton and Kanata on the landfill issue.

With so many new people moving into our community, a lot of residents don’t know the details of the proposed landfill expansion, or about the problems with the existing landfill when it was in operation.  Take odour for example: between 2006-2009, there were 7,500 complaints about the smell.

Here’s a note that the group shared earlier today. Continue reading


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