Tag Archives: goulbourn

WETLANDS: A regulatory loophole you can drive a dump truck through

(PHOTO: Ken McRae says he believe some landowners on Flewellyn Road are dumping fill into wetlands to avoid Provincially Significant Wetland designation. Photo by Devyn Barrie.)

A local environmental activist believes some Goulbourn property owners are taking advantage of a regulatory loophole to destroy wetland on their property.

Ken McRae says he’s seen dump trucks delivering fill to a property on Flewellyn that he believes is being dumped into wetland. Continue reading


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MARCH 25: A digital reprise of “Caretaker of Dreams”

(via Goulbourn Township Historical Society)

You’re in for a treat as the Goulbourn Township Historical Society digitally reprises the Millennium Pageant “Caretaker of Dreams” on Saturday March 25, 2017 at the Richmond Legion. The play was written by Barbara Bottriell, directed by Shelagh Mills and produced by the Goulbourn Millennium Project Committee.

The pageant was held November 22-25, 2000 in the then-new Theatre of the Performing Arts at Sacred Heart Catholic High School. This was a great community event including over 100 Township actors, musicians and dancers supported by dance director Christine Delorme-Lamarche, sets by Ron Martin, lighting by Paul Gardner, musical director Barbara Bottriell, costumes by Lynn Griffiths and production co-ordination by Hilary Dick.

Videographer Sandy Durocher recorded this spectacular event., and it is this recording transformed into a digital format by Russell Mason, that we will be showing at the Richmond Legion as our March community event. Show time is 1:30pm. The Legion is located at 6430 Ottawa Street, Richmond. As always, admission, parking and refreshments are free. And remember, tell a neighbour, bring a friend!

The pageant tells the story of Goulbourn Township from the early Richmond settlement in 1818 to the youths’ vision of the future beyond 2000. It was conceived not as a history lesson, but as recognition of the achievements of the township pioneers. The play was initially planned as a millennial project, but also became a record of our history as the Province on Ontario decreed that Goulbourn Township would disappear with the expanded border of the City of Ottawa in 2000.

The Goulbourn Historical Society was sponsor of the project and the play was produced by the Goulbourn Millennium Project Committee chaired by Jean Shaw.


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NOTEBOOK: Development notes, O’Leary in Kanata, music in Stittsville

UPDATE ON HAZELDEAN CAR DEALERSHIP
There’s a revised site plan online for the proposed car dealership at 5835 Hazeldean Road. The property is currently a gravel lot for the Canadian Auto Mall, with a temporary sales trailer on site. Continue reading


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SECRETS OF GOULBOURN: Ghosts, murder, cemeteries and other unknowns

(ABOVE: A sign installed on a post at the scene of the murder of Robert McCaffrey.)

This sounds interesting: “Have you heard stories about ghosts, murder, cemeteries and other unknowns in your community? Attend this event on February 18 to discover in full detail all of the grisly or odd activities that have taken place right here in your own backyard. There will be displays with court records, photos and written accounts of these unknowns.”

Local researcher Lesley McKay is helping to organize the event and she sent along a preview of some of the “secrets” that will be on display.  They’re all rooted in what was known as Goulbourn Township, a large area that included Richmond, Munster and Stittsville prior to being amalgamated into the City of Ottawa in 2000.

Some of the stories are rather dark:

  • A love triangle that led to a murder in 1882. (Commemorated by a sign installed on a post at the scene of the murder, pictured above.)
  • The KKK’s presence in the area starting in the 1920s. (“‘It’s a forgotten part of Canada’s past, and conveniently forgotten. Everybody knows about the Klan in the United States, but if you tell Canadians what happened here, they say – ‘What, us?'”)
  • A few ghost stories, including an abandoned pioneer cemetery in Marlborough Forest. It was discovered by municipal surveyors in the 1990s.

….while some of the stories are a little more light-hearted:

  • Stittsville native Ken Doraty, who played for the Toronto Maple Leafs and Boston Bruins in the 1920s and 1930s.  He was the smallest man to ever play in the NHL, at 133 lbs and a height of 5’7”.
  • How a Montreal millionaire financed a school garden in Richmond – part of a radical idea to change Ontario education.
  • Goulbourn’s booming cheese industry.  (“After the 1938 Richmond bank robbery, it was concluded that the three robbers knew that the bank was holding more than the usual amount of cash. This was surmised because three of our local cheese factories had issued cheques for milk supplied, hence making for a profitable robbery.”)
  • Lost quarries and watering holes, where kids used to cool off in the summer long before air conditioning and water parks.

The event is on Saturday from 1:00pm-4:00pm at the Stittsville Library, as part of Heritage Day activities. More info here…

Hazeldean Cheese Factory
Hazeldean Cheese Factory

Stittsville's Ken Doraty played for the Toronto Maple Leafs in the NHL.


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New street names revealed: Bobcat, Snowberry, Brae, Henry Goulburn, Turtleback

Councillor Shad Qadri shared the information below in an email to residents today. We like to hear from our readers, particularly people who live on the effective streets: What do you think of the new names chosen? Add a comment below or email feedback@stittsvillecentral.ca


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“Ghoul”bourn Street haunted backyard opens Oct 29-31

Joe Chenette of “Ghoul”bourn Street sent along a note to let us know that his haunted backyard will be open again this year leading up to Halloween. Continue reading


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How would you like to live on Velociraptor Avenue?

Is this the Stittsville version of Boaty McBoatface?  In our informal survey on new Stittsville street names, so far our readers have picked Velociraptor Street as their favourite name for Bell Street.

Our readers voted "Velociraptor" as their favourite name for Bell Street. This chart show the top five picks after 200 votes.
Our readers voted “Velociraptor” as their favourite name for Bell Street. This chart show the top five picks after 200 votes.

 

Continue reading


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UPDATE: Here’s the final list of new Stittsville street names

If you live on Bell Street, Goulbourn Street, Elm Crescent, Long Meadow Way, or Meadowland Drive, watch your mailbox this week for your opportunity to vote on a new name for your street.

The shortlist of names is actually quite a long list. The choices for each street include 105 names that were submitted by residents and passed the city’s street naming criteria.

The eclectic list includes Beluga, Bonfire, Boxty, Canada Goose, Foamberry, Fun, Knowledge, Little Village, Muskie, Puddle, Seagull, Shiraz, Star Cloud, Whiskey, Velociraptor and Yokoso. Continue reading


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UPDATE: No commemorative street names in this round

(PHOTO: Warner-Colpitts Lane is named after Sterling Warner and Ian Colpitts, two Stittsville volunteers who were instrumental in building the Johnny Leroux Arena.)

Councillor Shad Qadri provided an update on the process to rename five Stittsville streets, and has confirmed that “street names acknowledging meritorious members of the community” won’t make the shortlist.  Instead, they’ll be reserved for use in future neighbourhoods. Continue reading


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COMMENT: New street names should honour community leaders

(PHOTO: Warner-Colpitts Lane is named after Sterling Warner and Ian Colpitts, two Stittsville volunteers who were instrumental in building the Johnny Leroux Arena. We should recognize more of our community leaders – past and present – with commemorative street names.)

You have just under two weeks to submit your street name ideas to the City of Ottawa. Back in June, city staff gave residents an extended deadline of August 12 to send in their suggestions for five local streets. That was after staff received a lot of negative input about the original suggestions.

The city was right to re-open the suggestion process. Stittsville ended up with un-inspiring names like “Foilage”, “Plaintain” and “Boxty” (the Irish Pancake) in the first round. Continue reading


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UPDATE: City extends street name suggestion deadline to August 12

Several readers received emails today from Rebecca Anderson of the City’s Building Code Services department, alerting them to the fact that the City will be re-opening the consultation process for new Stittsville street names.

“Given the feedback we have received, I have agreed to reopen the discussion and allow another opportunity for residents to provide more suggestions for potential street names,” she wrote.

Residents will have until August 12 to submit name suggestions, but they’ll have to meet the City’s street naming criteria.

Councillor Shad Qadri sent this update via email to residents later this afternoon:

I want to thank all of you who have provided feedback on the street re-naming process being undertaken for Bell, Elm, Goulbourn, Meadowlands and Long Meadow Way.  I hope that you can appreciate this is a difficult process and that I too would prefer the names to remain the same as they have been long standing names in our community.

Unfortunately we must understand the reality that these changes must be done and that one of the main reasons for the change is due to safety concerns expressed by Emergency Services as similar names could result in staff being allocated to the wrong address.  There was consideration made as to which street in the City would be required to be changed and the City reviewed a number of factors when deciding which street to re-name, the comparison can be seen here.

Given the feedback we have received, Rebecca Anderson in Building Code Services and I have agreed to re-open the discussion and allow another opportunity for residents to provide more suggestions for potential street names.  I want to stress that this situation is not being taken lightly by the City and that I am very pleased that Rebecca Anderson is willing to re-open the item and allow for more suggestions to be considered.  I do request that residents please remember to be respectful of City staff and understand that they are here to work with us on this matter.

  • It’s important to note that names must be vetted through the City and that is why you may not have seen some of your previous suggestions provided as options.  You can view the names that have already been suggested and vetted here.   
  • In making your suggestions it is useful to review the City’s website regarding Street Name Changes which also includes the Criteria for Street Naming, please visitwww.ottawa.ca/streetnames .
  • I also encourage you to visit Geo Ottawa as you will be able to determine if a street name already exists http://maps.ottawa.ca/geoOttawa/ .
  • Residents do also have the opportunity to submit a commemorative names through the City’s Commemorative Naming process .

In the first round of street name suggestions the City did receive commemorative naming applications, some of which passed the City’s vetting process and could be suitable for use.  As two of the names were submitted for the same street I was concerned that this could create tension between the families if both names were provided as options and therefore did not provide any of the commemorative names as options.  That being said, I have been in contact with some of the families to further discuss their applications and at this time I do hope to provide them as options in the next round of request for feedback for names.

Next Steps

  • Please direct your suggested street names to Rebecca Anderson by August 12, 2016 via email to Rebecca.Anderson@ottawa.ca and you may also send it to my email atShad.Qadri@ottawa.ca .  Alternatively you can also mail your recommendations to Rebecca Anderson, City of Ottawa, 3rd Floor, 101 Centrepointe Drive (04-11), Ottawa, ON  K2G 5K7.
  • Residents will received mailed letters in September seeking their feedback on another round of names.
  • Final decision to be made by the end of 2017.

If you have further questions please feel free to contact myself and Rebecca Anderson at Rebecca.Anderson@ottawa.ca .  Affected residents on these streets being re-named will also receive this information and a letter from the City in the mail.


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Lots of street name suggestions, but few meet City’s criteria

(ABOVE: Boxty, a traditional Irish potato pancake, was suggested as a new name by a Goulbourn Street resident.)

UPDATE, JUNE 28: City extends street naming process to August 12


The City of Ottawa received 236 suggestions for six streets in Stittsville requiring a name change, but only 26 met the criteria for acceptable street names.

“I didn’t know this either before I was in the street name business. Because we have so many streets out there, it’s hard to find a new name. It’s hard to find words that are clear and sound distinct. This is all about emergency responders,” says Françoise Lecrouart, a manager with the City of Ottawa’s building code services department. Continue reading


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LETTER: Where are the historical street names?

Re:  Sugar Shack or Mitig? City offers new street name options

Not one of the names suggested by the City of Ottawa for the six streets in question has any historical significance for our community.  Were these names suggested by Stittsville residents?

Algonquins didn’t live in or around the Stittsville location so why introduce Aboriginal names?  Even Campground Way is a stretch because although it is adjacent to where the Holiness Methodist property was,  it sounds like an ordinary campground rather than  a camp that was part of a whole religious tradition.

Why are no historical names of early settlers or those who have contributed to the community among the names presented by the City? We’ve taken care to name a number of our streets after the farm families who owned the original property where the streets were located.

Names  such as “Mitig” are meaningless to most of us who live here.  I don’t think proper consultation was made with residents.  I also think the fact that a larger number of residents on the “Goulbourn Street” in the City of Ottawa should not have taken precedence over the fact that our township was called Goulbourn, and this is one of the important memories of who we were before amalgamation.  The street was not only named after Sir Henry Goulbourn but also represented the identity of the township that was created.  To simply do away with it because a street in the city has more people on it, is insulting to all the residents of the former Goulbourn Township.

Barbara Bottriell
Stittsville 

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Sugar Shack or Mitig? City offers new street name options

Residents on several Stittsville streets received letters today with options for new road names.

The City of Ottawa said back in January that six streets (Bell Street, Goulbourn Street, Elm Crescent, Long Meadow Way, Meadowland Drive, and Walker Road) need to be renamed because they sound too much like other streets in Ottawa. Continue reading


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Public meeting on June 20 about Goulbourn / Flewellyn wetland study

(Above: Former farmland, now wetland along Flewellyn Road. Photo from November 2014.)

The City of Ottawa is holding a long-awaited information meeting later this month to share the results of a study on the Goulbourn Wetland Complex. The complex is a series of wetlands in a large area south and west of Stittsville that’s been identified as “Provincially Significant Wetland” (PSW).

Around 2004, a development proposal on Flewellyn Road triggered a review of all land in the area by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. That review resulted in the identification of “new” PSW on about 60 properties. (We reported on this back in 2014 in an article titled “Property values drained by wetland designation”.) Continue reading


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LETTER: The man waving at the train is my grandfather

The last train through Stittsville on its way to the west coast, January 14, 1990. Photo by John Bottriell.
The last train through Stittsville on its way to the west coast, January 14, 1990. Photo by John Bottriell.

 

Re: Library display marks 25 years since Stittsville’s last VIA train

The man waving in the beige jacket is my grandfather and the man driving the train is his best friend. They have both since passed. It’s a special picture.

I was only 8 when this photo was taken. My grandfather’s name was Phil Barton. He’s waving at his best friend, Lorne Blackburn. He lived in Richmond. (My grandmother thinks his son still lives there.)

This particular day was Lorne’s last run. He retired after spending his entire working life on the railways. It was also my Grampa’s birthday. My grandmother was also there that day but obviously not standing near him. She said that they had been friends since they were teenagers and obviously shared many stories.

My grandparents moved to Stittsville in 1989. I have lived in Stittsville since the summer after that picture and still live here.

My grandmother was very pleased that you’ve shown interest in this, so thank you!

Amanda Wilson
Stittsville


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Library display marks 25 years since Stittsville’s last VIA train

Time flies, but it in this case I guess you could say it goes down the track.

It’s been a quarter century since the last train passed through Stittsville, and the Goulbourn Township Historical society has set up a new display at the Stittsville Public Library to celebrate the event. Continue reading


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Bradley-Craig farm sits on land that’s worth $1-million per acre

(ABOVE: “Bradley-Craig Barn (detail)” – Photo by Joe Newton.)

Anyone who wants to redevelop the Bradley-Craig barn on Hazeldean Road is going to have some deep pockets.  The serviced land it’s sitting on is worth about $1-million per acre, according to city councillor Shad Qadri.

Qadri gave an update on the status of the Bradley-Craig farmstead to members of the Goulbourn Township Historical Society (GTHS) at their annual general meeting today at Stittsville United Church in Munster. Continue reading


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