Tag Archives: mnr

WETLANDS: A regulatory loophole you can drive a dump truck through

(PHOTO: Ken McRae says he believe some landowners on Flewellyn Road are dumping fill into wetlands to avoid Provincially Significant Wetland designation. Photo by Devyn Barrie.)

A local environmental activist believes some Goulbourn property owners are taking advantage of a regulatory loophole to destroy wetland on their property.

Ken McRae says he’s seen dump trucks delivering fill to a property on Flewellyn that he believes is being dumped into wetland. Continue reading


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Here’s what you should do if you meet a coyote in Stittsville

One of my favourite things about summertime is Stittsville is sleeping with the windows open and hearing howling coyotes in the distance.

Up until a few weeks ago, I’d never seen one.  Then one day while driving down Huntmar, I saw a pair of small coyotes hanging out in the field north of the Arcadia subdivision.

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Blanding’s Turtle habitat to be affected by Potter’s Key development

(File photo: Blanding’s Turtle along Hazeldean Road.  Photo by Ken McRae.)

Minto is proposing several measures to protect Blanding’s Turtles at the new Potter’s Key development on Hazeldean Road. They’ve applied to Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) for permission to proceed with the development, which could impact the animals, classified as a Species at Risk in Ontario (SARO). Continue reading


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A FINE BALANCE: Study looks at why Goulbourn wetlands are changing

(ABOVE: Looking north from the Trans Canada Trail, west of Stittsville, June 2016. Photo illustration.)

“No interrupting, no swearing, no shouting. We’re all here to be heard, and this is a professional meeting,” said the moderator.

She was laying down the ground rules for a public meeting on Monday about the results of a long-awaited study looking at wetlands in the area. Continue reading


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Maybe it was a cougar after all?

(ABOVE: Photo illustration.)

Last week we published a story called “It’s probably not a cougar that you saw in Stittsville” after neighbours on Savage Drive thought they saw a cougar, and snapped some photos of the tracks the animal left behind.

The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) say they haven’t had a confirmed cougar sighting in Ontario since 1884, but many of our readers are convinced that there are cougars living in the province.

What about the cougar in the Kanata hay loft last year?  Or the one that the MNR caught in Grafton, Ontario a couple years ago?
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It’s probably not a cougar that you saw in Stittsville

(ABOVE: Neighbours on Savage Drive think this paw print may be from a cougar. Photo via Pat Goyette.)

It’s not impossible, but it’s unlikely there are any cougars wandering around Stittsville, despite recent reports of exactly that. In fact, there hasn’t been a confirmed sighting of a wild cougar in this province for 132 years.

We’ve been reading about a few possible cougar sightings in the area on social media. Late in May, neighbours on Savage Drive (south of Hazeldean) reported spotting what they thought was a cougar coming out of Amberway Park.  They posted these footprints.

Residents on Savage Drive took these photos of footprints after they saw that they thought was a cougar.

Residents on Savage Drive took these photos of footprints after they saw that they thought was a cougar.
Photos via Pat Goyette.

 

We forwarded the photographed footprints to Kamal Khidas, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Khidas said the photographs were too poor quality to have any certainty, but there was no clear indication the prints came from a cougar. He suggested it may have come from a wolf instead.

A wolf is just one of dozens of animals people could confuse for a cougar, says Jane Devlin, management biologist with the Kemptville office of the Ministry of Natural Resources.

“I think the common animals that are confused and mistakenly identified as a cougar could be a white-tailed deer, dog, domestic cat, a bobcat, even a fisher… it could be any number of those.”

She says the ministry receives reports of cougars all the time, but there’s never solid evidence to confirm one – not since 1884, the last confirmed sighting of a wild cougar.

Devlin didn’t rule out the possibility of an escaped cougar from captivity, for example from a zoo or an exotic pet owner. If there were any around Ottawa, trail cams would likely have taped them.

Whether it’s a cougar or not, Devlin said there are important safety tips to keep in mind in case you are confronted by a wild animal. Face it directly, back away slowly, make lots of noise and try to appear larger than you actually are.

And please, no cougar jokes. We’ve heard them all.


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Something fishy with Carp River pathway plan, say observers

(Above: A heron and ducks swim along the Carp River between Hazeldean and Maple Grove.  This photo looks north towards Maple Grove from the Hazeldean Road Bridge.)

After years of delay, restoration of the Carp River in Kanata and Stittsville will start this fall, but some observers say the planned recreational paths will be prone to excessive flooding.

Erwin Dreessen of Ottawa’s Greenspace Alliance is one of several people in the community who’ve been keeping a close eye on development around the river.

“The design would see those pathways flooded with a two-year storm,” he says.  “It’s not in accordance with what one expect with responsible government to approve… I find this very disturbing.”

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A contract to carry out the work — a project known as the Carp River Restoration Plan (CRRP) — will be awarded on September 11 and construction is expected to start shortly after that.  It covers 5.2km of river from Hazeldean Road to north of Richardson Side Road.

The City of Ottawa, along with the Kanata West Owners Group (KWOG) has been developing the plan since 2000.  It’s the blueprint for an engineering project that would alter the existing Carp River to reduce flooding during spring runoff and heavy rainfalls and allow for more nearby development in what for years was considered a floodplain.

KWOG, the consortium of landowners who control most of the property along the river, are paying 70% of the cost of the restoration. In 2006, City Council agreed to pick up 30% of the tab, in part because of the benefit that the recreational pathways would provide to residents.

The first phase of the work (from the 417 to Richardson Side Road) is expected to be complete in fall 2016 and future phases (from the Queensway south to Hazeldean) will be done by the end of 2017.

In 2006 the total price tag was estimated at $5-million.  The most recent estimate, based on a preliminary design, is $14.8-million, according to the City.  The final price tag won’t be known until the tender process is complete.

The Carp River Restoration plan includes 5200 linear meters of water from Hazeldean Road to just north of Richardson Side Road.  Work will be completed in phases starting this fall, and is expected to last until November 2017.
The Carp River Restoration plan includes 5200 linear meters of water from Hazeldean Road to just north of Richardson Side Road. Work will be completed in phases starting this fall, and is expected to last until November 2017.

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THE START OF THE WORK THIS FALL WILL FOLLOW YEARS OF STUDIES, CONSULTATION AND CONTROVERSYThe final design that was tendered by KWOG earlier this summer went through the scrutiny of a variety of governments departments and agencies from the municipal to the federal level.

“We’ve actually been through many years of very rigorous approvals. The approvals that we have, we have them from the City, from Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, from the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Ontario Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Natural Resources, and even the Ministry of Transportation just to go under the freeway bridge… This has taken many many years to get the point we’re at now.” said Kathleen Willis, the project manager for KWOG.

What Dreesen and others are concerned about are the flood elevation levels. Early plans called for recreational pathways at a 1:100 year flood elevation. As the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority explains: “A 1:100 year flood is a major flood that risks causing serious damage to people and property. These major floods have a 1% chance of occurring in any given year. To compare, a 50 year flood has a 2% chance of occurring in any given year. Simply because a major flood occurs does not mean that it cannot re-occur the next year.”

Just a few centimetres change to the elevation, up or down, can have a large effect on the possibility of flooding.

Now, some sections of the remaining pathway are planned at a 1:2 to 1:10 elevation, meaning that there’s a 10-50% chance of flooding in any year.  That could mean the Carp River would overflow its banks and cover the pathways with anywhere from 30-100 centimeters of fast-moving water.  (One report suggested that signs warning of the possibility of flooding could be put up along the path to mitigate the safety risk.)

Besides the safety factor, there’s also the clean-up.  Every time the Carp floods the pathway — a 1-in-2 chance of happening each year — there will likely be clean-up required to get rid of the mud and debris that the river leaves behind.

There have been other tweaks since the last time the public was consulted on the plan during an environmental assessment in 2010, including skinnier pathways (from 4 meters down to 3), changes to fish habitat ponds, and the elimination of two pedestrian bridges over the mighty Carp.

“The current design approach is to build the pathways at grade to the river between the 1:2 and 1:10 year elevations. The final elevation of the pathway system will be in accordance with Provincial standards and City requirements,” the City said in an email attributed to Don Herweyer, Manager of Development Review.

“Each project is unique in the context of the Carp River and other situations across the City – recreational pathways are set at different elevations. In the case of the Carp River the proposed elevation of the pathway is the most appropriate design solution,” he wrote.

Just last year, the City spent about $400,000 in nearby Glen Cairn to elevate the pathways in Ravine Park to 1:25 year flood levels. That ravine feeds into the Carp River close to Terry Fox Road.

The Hazeldean Road bridge over the river was completed in 2011 with pathways underneath built to at least a 1:10 year flood level.  

Besides concerned citizens, at least one Ministry of Environment engineer has asked questions about the plan.

“Will the proposed pathway meet the City’s risk management policy with respect to parks and recreational facilities? Will the pedestrian pathway conform to the City’s risk management policy for stormwater conveyance infrastructure?” wrote Charles Goulet in a March 2014 email obtained via a freedom of information request.  “…The mix of flooding waters and children is a dangerous one.”

In 2011, the Hazeldean Road bridge over the Carp River was built with pathways at a minimum of 1:10 year flood elevation.
In 2011, the Hazeldean Road bridge over the Carp River was built with pathways at a minimum of 1:10 year flood elevation.
The pathways at Ravine Park in Kanata were built to a 1:25 year flood elevation in 2014.
The pathways at Ravine Park in Kanata were built to a 1:25 year flood elevation in 2014.

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WE CONTACTED THREE COUNCILLORS with wards that include parts of the Carp River, and asked them if they had concerns about flooding on the pathways.

“I do not have significant concerns with the pathway elevations,” wrote Stittsville councillor Shad Qadri. “Yes, there will be times when there is significant rainfall that the pathway ‎may flood, however that is often the case with parks and pathways in other areas of the city. In those cases residents exercise caution or avoid the area until it has dried.”

“I discussed the elevation of the pathways with staff last year and found out that they could not be higher as they need to have clearance under the Campeau Road bridge that will cross the Carp and it would be both difficult and expensive to raise the bridge higher due to soft soils in the area,” wrote Kanata North councillor Marianne Wilkinson.  “Temporary flooding of pathways is common – for example the paths along the Beaver Pond in Kanata North sometimes flood but they soon drain off and paths along the Ottawa River in West Ottawa do the same during the spring runoff.”

“Ravine (Park) is more than recreational as it links over 2,000 people to their only bus stop on Eagleson,” wrote Kanata South councillor Allan Hubley. “We also had significant erosion of private property issues that had to be dealt with thanks to a bad design in 2003. Unless there is special circumstances such as just provided, there is no reason for taxpayers to pay for the higher design level. The new pathway from Cope to Eagleson for example would be at same lower level.”

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THE PATHWAY PLANS ARE JUST THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG when it comes to issues with the CRRP, according to Dreesen.  He’s concerned with many aspects that he’s seen over the years, often uncovered through freedom of information requests.

“There’s so many things that have been done the wrong way throughout this whole saga,” says Dreesen. “We see flooding problems, we see a river that’s been badly abused, and we see it all seemingly motivated by a desire on the part of the development community to gain more land.”

“Eventually nature will give its answer. Let’s hope there’s no loss of life,” he says.


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Residents question health of Poole Creek wetland

(Above: Stittsville residents are concerned about the health of the Upper Poole Creek Wetland.  From left to right: Marcos Alvarez, Jonah Alvarez, Andrea Sedgwick, Ken McRae, Sylvie Sabourin, Mila (last name unknown). Photo via Ken McRae, October 2014.)

The Upper Poole Creek wetland is one of Stittsville’s greatest natural features. So many of us walk our dogs, jog, cycle or otherwise explore the Trans Canada Trail, and stop at the observation deck to look out over the marsh.

Sometimes you’ll see turtles, small fish, frogs, birds. It’s about a kilometre west of suburban boundary of Stittsville, and some of the best views are at sunrise and sunset. Continue reading


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