Tag Archives: safety

Ottawa Police conduct two-day school zone traffic blitz

(via Ottawa Police)

With students returning from winter holiday break, the Ottawa Police Traffic sections, assisted by School Resource Officers, conducted city-wide proactive traffic enforcement blitzes in school zones.

The two-day enforcement campaign, which took place January 13th and 14th , focused on traffic safety in and around school zones. In particular, officers looked for:

* speeding in school zones,
* failing to stop, failing to yield to pedestrians at school crossings,
* failing to obey crossing guards,
* failing to obey school bus signs,
* distracted driving.

As a result, a total of 127 Provincial Offence Notices were issued during this enforcement campaign.

The Ottawa Police Service continues to remind drivers to be alert when driving; this especially applies in school zones.


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Stay clear of ice covered surfaces, says Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority

With the recent cold weather and snowfall, lakes, rivers and creeks are beginning to freeze over. Although Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority (MVCA) does not monitor ice thickness, it is likely that ice cover on the majority of the waterbodies within the watershed is not sufficient to support any type of recreational activity at this time. With temperatures returning to above freezing in the long range forecast, ice conditions are not expected to improve. Continue reading


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COMMENTS OF THE WEEK: Getting involved in community safety

We received a lot of comments this week on our editorial Residents, not just police, have a role to play in community safety, written in response to a very low turn-out — just three people — at a meeting on community safety hosted by Councillor Qadri in November. Here are a couple letters with very interesting and thoughtful perspectives on the issue. Continue reading


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COMMENT: Residents, not just police, have a role to play in community safety

One morning earlier this year, residents living near A. Lorne Cassidy school in Crossing Bridge woke up to find broken beer bottles and garbage all over the school’s playground.

The residents had a powerful response: they grabbed work gloves and garbage bags, and cleaned up the mess.

They didn’t wait for city staff to clean it up, they didn’t point fingers and complain about it on Facebook.  They cleaned it up themselves, and in doing so sent a message to whoever caused the damage in the first place: we care about our community.

I keep hearing that residents are concerned with safety in Stittsville. There have been a number of bad vandalism incidents in the past few months. Shad Qadri says it was one of the top issues he heard about when campaigning last fall.

So I was disappointed to see that only three residents (plus our StittsvilleCentral.ca reporter) attended a community safety meeting hosted by Councillor Qadri on Wednesday. He deserves applause for trying to start a dialogue on community safety concerns, but I wouldn’t fault him for getting frustrated at the lack of involvement from the community.

Victor McNabney, a volunteer from Neighbourhood Watch, told the small crowd that Stittsville has two neighbourhood watches, down from eight less than a decade ago.

That echoes my experience working with the Fairwinds Community Association to get a Neighbourhood Watch going in our neighbourhood.  An example: One of our neighbours went door-to-door on her street last winter to ask residents to help start a Watch program. Only one responded.

Folks are quick to point fingers and offer up all kinds of blame on Facebook, but when it comes down to working constructively on the issue, the participation evaporates.

The police don’t have the capacity to respond to every small crime in our community, nor is it the best use of their resources.

The only long-term solution is prevention, and a great way to start is to do just what those residents in Crossing Bridge did: Role up your sleeves and get involved.

***

WHAT DO YOU THINK?  Why are participation levels dropping of for Neighbourhood Watch programs?  Why was attendance so low at the community meeting?  What constructive ideas do you have for tackling community crime? Add a comment below or email feedback@stittsvillecentral.ca


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QADRI: “An Open Discussion on Crime” – November 25 at GRC

(via Councillor Shad Qadri’s weekly newsletter)

We are fortunate to live in the great community of Stittsville which provides residents with a safe community to live, work and play.  However, there do continue to be incidents of vandalism and petty crime which are very upsetting to residents and creates an negative environment in the place we call home. Continue reading


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Halloween safety tips from the Ottawa Police

(press release)

To help families have a safe trick-or-treating experience, the Ottawa Police offers you the following tips and tricks:

  • Make sure your children can be seen. Visibility is an important safety consideration. Flashlights with fresh batteries, glow sticks and reflective tape are must-haves on Halloween and will enable drivers to see kids as they go door to door.
  • Children should walk on the sidewalk and go to well lit homes on one side of the street; then cross safely at an intersection to visit homes on the other side of the street.
  • Ensure costumes are fitted.  Make sure your child’s Halloween costume is made of flame-resistant materials and is well fitted. Costumes that drag on the ground can pose a tripping hazard, which can be a serious danger if kids fall while crossing the street. Masks, hats and other accessories should also fit your child properly without inhibiting their vision. Halloween makeup is a safer option.
  • Always trick-or-treat in groups. Accompany your children when they go out trick-or-treating.  Older children may want to go with friends.  If so, plan a route and make them carry a fully charged cell phone in case they get separated from the group.
  • Check Halloween candy carefully. Treat your kids to a Halloween snack before they head out so that they are less likely to eat the candy they gather before you have a chance to inspect their loot bags. Teach your children never to eat treats that are in packages that have been opened, show pinholes or have other damage. And remember, avoid homemade treats or fruit unless they are from a family member or close friend.
  • Find help. Teach your children to find a police officer if they are lost or need help while trick-or-treating.
  • Motorists: be aware of children on the streets.  With all the excitement some may forget to look both ways before crossing.  Drive carefully and slowly when on residential streets.

For more Halloween safety tips visit ottawapolice.ca


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Ottawa police issue back-to-school safety reminder, step up enforcement

(Photo: Speed sign on Hobin Street,  near A. Lorne Cassidy school. Photo by Barry Gray.)

(via Ottawa Police)

Over the next few days children will be returning to school and many will be busing, walking and riding their bikes to their destinations.

The Ottawa Police Service reminds motorists and pedestrians to be aware of the increase of children and youth on city streets. As school begins, please consider the following safety tips:

  • Reduce speeds in school zones and be ready to stop at any time. Children do not always notice oncoming traffic.
  • Obey school bus signals.
  • Walk on available sidewalks.
  • Always cross at intersections, looking and listening for traffic and walk across only when road is clear and safe to do so.
  • Follow adult crossing guards, student crossing patrols and school bus operator’s signals.
  • Always wear a helmet when riding a bike and walk your bike across a roadway.

For more safety tips, go to Back to School Safety.

Meanwhile, The Gatineau Police Service and Ottawa Police Service’s Selective Traffic Enforcement Program (STEP) will focus on school bus and school zones safety as well as vehicle occupant restraints during the month of September.

School Bus / School Zone Safety:

Between 2009 and 2013, there were 29 collisions resulting in 5 injuries involving school buses or occurring in school zones.

Vehicle Occupant Restraint:

Between 2009 and 2013, there were 183 collisions involving the lack of, or improper use of, vehicle occupant restraints resulting in 18 fatalities and 183 injuries.

The Safer Roads Ottawa Program is a leading community partnership between Ottawa Fire Services, Ottawa Paramedic Service, Ottawa Police Service, Ottawa Public Health and the Public Works Department committed to preventing or eliminating road deaths and serious injuries for all people in the City of Ottawa, through culture change, community engagement, and development of a sustainable safe transportation environment.

Also participating in the Safer Roads Ottawa Program are the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), Sureté du Québec, Department of National Defence’s Military Police and Gatineau Police Service to improve road safety for all residents of the national capital region.

Ottawa residents have identified traffic safety as a top priority. The Safer Roads Ottawa Program is committed to using available resources to make Ottawa roads safer for residents.


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Ottawa Fire will be knocking on doors June 1-8 to check on smoke alarms

(Press release via the City of Ottawa.)

Ottawa Fire Services (OFS) firefighters will be out in the community during the first week of June to encourage residents to install, test and ensure that smoke alarms in their homes are operating.

June 1 to 8 is the first of two eight-day blitzes OFS plans for 2015 as part of its annual Wake Up campaign. The second blitz will take place in the fall.

During this period homes throughout the city will receive visits from firefighters. The Ontario Fire Code requires homes to have a working smoke alarm on each floor and a working carbon monoxide alarm in each home.

Homeowners who need new or additional alarms will be given information on how to acquire one. Homeowners who do not have any working alarms may have one immediately installed for them, or be provided with new batteries.

Visits will take place between 6 and 8 p.m. on weekdays and between 2 and 4 p.m. on weekends. Firefighters will be in uniform and residents are not obligated to provide them access to their home. This is a courtesy call only.

Subdivisions built in the last five years are less likely to receive visits. If no one is home when OFS comes calling, fire safety information will be left in the mailbox.

Firefighters visit Ottawa homes in this manner year round and have been doing so since the Wake Up program began in 2005. For more information visit ottawa.ca.


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