Tag Archives: stittsville main

NOTEBOOK: How the City is paying for a gazebo at Village Square Park

“There is an exciting project coming to Village Square Park that I am pleased to share with everyone. A new gazebo will soon call the park its home.”
Councillor Shad Qadri’s newsletter, September 30

Map showing the location of the gazebo at the east end of Village Square Park.
Map showing the location of the gazebo at the east end of Village Square Park.

Councillor Shad Qadri recently revealed details about a gazebo being built at Village Square Park, at the corner of Stittsville Main and Abbott. The plan is to build a 16’x16′ raised stage at the east end of the park with electrical hook-ups, for use as a community performance space. The structure is already under construction and could be completed as early as November 1. Continue reading


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NOTEBOOK: Revised site plan approved for Stittsville Walk

(FILE PHOTO: Unfinished “Stittsville Walk” condos, March 6, 2016.)

“I suppose the best one can say is that it is no worse than the original proposal.”

That’s the reaction I received today from a long-time Stittsville resident who’s been following the progress — or lack thereof — of the Stittsville Walk condo development at 1491 Stittsville Main Street.  The project has been stalled since late 2013, and only one of the six blocks was ever built.  It remains unoccupied. Continue reading


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PHOTOS: Arts in the Park 2016

It was worth the wait! This year’s Arts in the Park had to be rescheduled after being totally washed out in June.  Dozens of artists and vendors packed Village Square Park for the annual event on Sunday, presented by the Stittsville Village Association.  Barry Gray was there with his camera to capture some of the fun. Continue reading


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Cafe-florist-bike shop set to open on Stittsville Main

(PHOTO: Thom Johnson will run Steelwool Cycleworks, the bike shop, and Kat Kosk will run Blumenstudio, the cafe-florist.)

UPDATE (AUGUST 6): They’re not quite ready to open yet. Posted to their Twitter feed yesterday: “.we still have a bit of tweaking to do .trims details bathroom & so on .please stay tuned for stittsville”


Stittsville will get a taste of trendy Hintonburg when Blumenstudio opens its doors on Saturday.

The new location will be at 1564 Stittsville Main Street, in the cinder block building that’s also home to Capital Cabinetry.  Renovations have recently been underway to replace bricks with windows at the front, creating a street-side retail space.

I dropped in on Friday night and met Kat Kosk, Thom Johnson and Paul Idone, the trio who are behind the venture. They were expecting a late night ahead as they prepared for a partial opening on Saturday.

Idone was building a bar near the front for the coffee part of the business, Kosk was moving in plants (lots of cacti and big leafy greens) and Johnson was building a web site on his laptop. Kosk’s dog was there to keep them company.

Idone owns the cabinetry business, and Johnson his business partner.  Johnson will run the bike part of the business, under the name Steelwool Cycleworks. Johnson’s also an owner at Talltree Cycles on Wellington Street in Hintonburg.

Kosk owns Blumenstudio on Parkdale Avenue in Hintonburg.  It’s a popular high-end floral shop and cafe that’s been open since March 2011.  The location in Stittsville will follow the same concept.

Cactus at blumenstudio
Cactus!

 

Kosk said they had lots of neighbours dropping by today to say hello, and they’re looking forward to meeting more Stittsville residents when they open on Saturday. Johnson’s bike shop should open a couple of weeks.

It’s great to see another interesting indie shop opening up on Stittsville Main Street. Welcome to the neighbourhood!


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FOOD TRUCKS: Keeping it cool with Mellow Yellow

(Photo by Devyn Barrie.)

The Stittsville food truck scene already has a good amount of variety. Anne Wilby (pictured above) plans to add a lot more with Mellow Yellow.

Wilby is no stranger to the food business. Growing up with an Italian father and Polish mother, her family was always cooking. In the 1980s, she ran a hospitality training program for at-risk youth in Stittsville. She was also manager of Lousiannie’s on Main Street for 14 years, before it closed and burned down. Continue reading


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Medical imaging centre will open this fall on Stittsville Main Street

Here’s a note from Councillor Shad Qadri about a medical imaging centre opening at 1609 Stittsville Main Street later this year. That’s next door to the Dynacare medical lab next to Greco:

***

I am pleased to announce that a new Stittsville Medical Imaging Centre will be opening this fall. Services offered will include X-rays and ultrasound exams, including prenatal 3D ultrasounds.

Last year I connected with the business’ new owners and asked for Stittsville’s thoughts on such a service which was received with an overwhelmingly positive response. Now, I will continue to work closely with the owners to ensure that the needs of Stittsville continue to be met.

The branch will be located at 1609 Stittsville Main St and I will be certain to provide more details including a grand opening date as the time nears.

If you are interested in learning more about the services being offered or if you are a talented sonographer, X-ray technician or administrative staff who live in the area looking for full time or part time work, please contact Dr. Gregory Davies at gdavies@stittsvilleimaging.ca.


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THIS OLD HOUSE: Lytle family puts Stittsville Main Street home up for sale

(ABOVE: Cathy Lytle stands in front of her family’s home at 1495 Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Devyn Barrie.)

After more than a century on Stittsville Main Street, the Lytle House is up for sale.  The asking price is $499,000 according to Brent Taylor of Brentcom Realty. “Redevelopment ideal for retail, service commercial, office, residential and institutional uses, including mixed-use buildings, and excluding auto-related uses,” says the listing.

It’s a large lot, 100 feet along the street and 160 feet deep.

Cathy Lytle says the house has been standing since at least 1900, and it’s been in her family for 64 years. While it doesn’t have a heritage designation, it is on the city’s heritage registry. That doesn’t give it any protection, but if a future owner applies to demolish it, the City could do a review that could lead to full heritage designation.


DEVYN BARRIE: What can you tell me about the history of the house?

CATHY LYTLE: It was built in 1900 from a bachelor and it was sold four years later to a young couple… he was a tinkerer and they raised their daughter, Evelyn. She took cancer and died and then the father died of old age and the mother died after she sold the house to my parents… she lived with my parents for five years, she had herself written into the deed, for one bedroom and three meals a day and they got along fine, until she passed away.


Ab & Gwen Lytle's house, 1976. Photo from the Goulbourn Township Historical Society archives via Lesley McKay.
Ab & Gwen Lytle’s house, 1976. Photo from the Goulbourn Township Historical Society archives via Lesley McKay.

 

DB: It must have been something to grow up here and watch the town change all around it, hey?

CL: It’s not the [same] town anymore. Doesn’t matter which window you look out, it’s not the same at all. It’s funny, we were just saying I can remember all the places we used to go and play and climb trees and whose farmer fields we used to run through. And I said, now people look at you and say “well no, there was something else” or “No, no that was just all field.”

But yeah, [there have] been changes, it’s been hard on some of the older ones to see some of the changes.

DB: What’s it been like for you?

CL: I’m okay with some of the change, I just don’t like people coming in and telling me how to live. They want certain things changed here… but you’re taking away the essence of a small town.

DB: Why sell the house?

CL: Oh, we can’t afford to keep everything up. [My mother is] 87, she’s not well. My dad was a small contracting excavator, he left her a little bit of money, she was only on old age pension, she can only do so much. I only work part time and I work a minimum wage job… I can’t afford it. So, we decided to go to something that we both can manage and enjoy.

Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.
Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.

DB: How does it feel to have to leave this house behind?

CL: I’m okay. I’m ready. And I think she’s ready too. She’s had [a longer time] here, she’s raised her family and I was born here. We’re all business and everybody else has gone out and done better, this will help pay for some medical bills coming down the road…

… It’ll be sad in a way, but we have our memories, we have our pictures and they can’t take that away from us.

DB: Any idea what might happen to the house if it does get sold?

CL: We’ve had a business here for 40 years, like everybody else on Main Street. They had their house and their business right there. Last 20 years my dad’s been dead and we got rid of the business, so it’s kinda nice to think that somebody else will come in and make a go of it… maybe put something in like an ice cream store or something that reflects the core, not an office building or something. But it’s up to them.

DB: What do you think about the state of Main Street in general today?

CL: Well, when I grew up there was no sidewalks. It was a main highway… the traffic was heavy but now… you can’t sit outside, it’s hard to hear outside, the dust picks up, people come in on either side of you… it’s changed a lot compared to what I used to play, run and climb every tree in this place. It was a lot different… I watch the kids over in the park, but it’s not the same. We used to like the trains coming in and watching the people and wave, you don’t do that anymore. You can’t, there’s nothing there. And these people who are using the park don’t understand what was really there and I think they would have enjoyed it a lot better.

This interview was originally heard on Stittsvegas. Click here to listen to the full interview…

Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.
Lytle House, June 2016. Photo by Glen Gower.

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Historic Green’s Hotel on Stittsville Main for sale at $1.4-million

(ABOVE: File photo by Barry Gray.)

The only heritage-designed building on Stittsville Main Street is up for sale.

The brick building that’s home to Hudson Insurance at 1510 Stittsville Main Street is listed for $1.4-million.  It’s also home to Robin’s Nail Salon and Studio Esthetics.

“Iconic Heritage mixed use Building in the heart of Stittsville. This all brick building with wrap around porch features a mix of office, retail, and residential units. The extra deep 464 foot lot allows for the possibility to expand the building in the future. Plenty of on site parking,” according to the real estate listing.
Continue reading


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First-ever Jane’s Walk comes to Stittsville Main on May 7

Will Stittsville Main Street be Ottawa’s next great neighbourhood street?

That’s the question we’ll discuss on Saturday, May 7 as part of Stittsville’s first-ever Jane’s Walk. I’ll be leading a walking tour down Stittsville Main at 10:00am, starting from Village Square Park (Stittsville Main @ Abbott). The walk will last about 90 minutes.

Jane’s Walk Ottawa is a city-wide festival of neighbourhood walking tours led by locals who care passionately about where they live, work and play. The goal is to improve urban literacy by offering insights into local history, planning, design, and civic engagement through the simple act of walking and observing.

Continue reading


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UNWELCOME: Graffiti to be removed from Stittsville Main Street wall

ABOVE: Welcome to Stittsville, early 2015. Photo by Joe Newton.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: We’ve been wondering for a while if that “Welcome To Stittsville” graffiti on Stittsville Main Street was intentional or an act of vandalism. While it’s a nice message, the artistic execution leaves a lot to be desired. Devyn Barrie made some calls and came up with an answer.)

One local business tormented for years by graffiti is hoping for a permanent solution as it prepares to once again cover up an unwanted message on its property. Continue reading


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Slow sales push back construction of Stittsville Walk condos

Despite a change of ownership and a total rebranding, the condo development at 1491 Stittsville Main Street is still struggling to find buyers, pushing the expected completion date to mid-2017.

Taylor Bennett, sales representative for Bennett Property Shop Realty, has been in charge of the account since December and admits it’s difficult to sell homes in the current environment.

“It’s not the greatest time for real estate,” he explains. “So we haven’t done a huge amount of marketing yet.”

The site was rebranded as Stittsville Walk after a change in ownership in the summer of 2015.

However construction isn’t expected to begin until the end of 2016 and it could be later if there’s not enough interest.

“It really depends on how sales go,” says Bennett. “Once we have a little more than half sold out they can start building it, which will take six months.”

Construction for an original project called Reverie Quarters ceased in 2013, and the original design sparked community backlash that eventually led to the drafting of a new Community Design Plan (CDP) for Stittsville Main Street.

Bennett says a reason behind the current rebrand is to “make it more accepted.”

The original site plan called for four of the condo buildings, plus a fifth multi-story commercial building along Stittsville Main Street. Bennett confirmed that while there are no plans to eliminate any of the five buildings in the original plan, they will all be redesigned.

To this end, the company has introduced new 1,500-square foot bungalow units with indoor parking in addition to the two-storey terrace townhouses originally advertised.

The rebrand had to include the structure from the previous development, complicating the process for Bennett and his team.

“We didn’t have total freedom,” he explains. “Ideally we wanted to have a bunch of one-level living styles, but we were confined to the existing building.”

Nevertheless he says the new plan will be appropriate for Stittsville Main as envisioned in the new CDP.

“I think the bungalows will be well received,” says Bennett. “We think this fits the demographic looking to live in Stittsville a little better.”

Artist conception of what the new Stittsville Walk will look like.
Artist conception of what the new Stittsville Walk will look like.

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New medical lab opens on Stittsville Main

Rapid population growth and a large senior population convinced Dynacare to open a new medical lab on Stittsville Main Street.

The new location at 1609 Stittsville Main Street (next to Greco)  opened Monday, with a staff of three.

Manager Linda Poulin tells StittsvilleCentral.ca the clinic hired local people to staff it and plans to expand the operation as it acquires more patients. She says it currently only offers bloodwork and sample testing. Continue reading


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COMMENT: Seven reasons why a proposed drive-thru doesn’t fit on Stittsville Main

Is a drive-thru appropriate on a traditional main street? In some places yes, but the drive-thru proposed for Stittsville Main Street falls far short of what city planners say should be allowed.

A fast food drive-thru is proposed for Stittsville Main in front of Brown’s Independent. It will be the first real test of the new Stittsville Main Community Design Plan (CDP). Approved in 2015, the CDP (and its cousin, the Stittsville Main Street Secondary Plan) is supposed to provide a framework for development over the next few decades on our traditional main street. Continue reading


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Fast food restaurant proposed on Stittsville Main near Brown’s

There’s a new site site plan control posted to the City’s web site with a proposal to “construct a one storey fast food restaurant with associated drive through”.

“The requested application would allow for the development of a one (1) storey fast food restaurant with approximately 2,950 ft² (274 m²) of gross floor area and a drive-through,” according to the documents. Continue reading


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