Tag Archives: walking

UPDATE: More about Stittsville sidewalks

Last week we published a list of ten spots in Stittsville in need of sidewalk or pedestrian upgrades. We asked readers for your suggestions and heard from a lot of you. Here’s a sampling:

“I live in Traditions area. Why is there not a sidewalk from Fernbank to Elm Street along Stittsville Main Street? Where the church is. Children who want to walk from Traditions to where the gas station is, have to cross at Fernbank, go across a busy street, then go past the library, and cross at the light there. We need a sidewalk on the west side of the road there.” -Lori Claringbold Continue reading


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MIS-STEP: A list of mysteriously missing sidewalks

(ABOVE: Walking down Stittsville Main Street during Jane’s Walk 2016. Photo by Barry Gray.)

The Ottawa Neighbourhood Study gives Stittsville a walkability score for of 54% for pedestrian infrastructure. That’s slightly above the city average of 50%, but it suggests there are a lot of places where we can do better. Here’s a list of 10 spots in need of an upgrade for pedestrians.

Stittsville walkability score
Ottawa Neighbourhood Study, 2016.

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COMMENT: Five places to enjoy the great outdoors on Thanksgiving Monday

(PHOTO: Lookout over the marsh at the head of Poole Creek, along the Trans Canada Trail just west of Stittsville.  Photo by Glen Gower.)

As I sit down to write this it’s a very crisp (1°C) but bright Thanksgiving Monday. I hope you can take some time today to get outside for a run, a walk or a bike ride and enjoy one of the many trails we have close to us in Stittsville. (Bring your camera too – the fall colours are incredible.) Here are five of my favourite paths nearby. Continue reading


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Interactive map shows car collisions with pedestrians and cyclists

While any number of collisions between cars and pedestrians or cyclists is too many, Stittsville has a relatively low number compared to other areas in Ottawa.

The map was created by Alex deVries, vice-president of Citizens for Safe Cycling. It’s an interactive heat map on their web site that shows car-pedestrian and car-cyclist collisions in Ottawa over ten years, from 2004 to 2013.  You can check it out here…

“Over time, the absolute number of reported collisions involving pedestrians or cyclists has remained relatively flat, even though both Ottawa’s population and the popularity of cycling have increased dramatically over these years,” they note. “The number of collisions for cyclists, relative to population and the growth in cycling, is actually down.”

StittsvilleCentral.ca asked deVries about why he created the map. Here’s his reply:

I created the site to provide some information people could use to understand patterns in collisions of cyclists and pedestrians. City staff are using this tool to understand where and when collisions occur.

There were several surprises in this to me:
– the location of pedestrian and cycling collisions are not the same; in Stittsville, there’s quite a few collisions on Stittsville Main St, but the cyclist collisions are more likely to be at intersections. Pedestrian collisions are where there aren’t cross-walks.
– cycling collisions tend to be near bridges and near strip malls, and where there are no bicycle lanes.
– there’s an impression that there are more cycling collisions now more than ever. This isn’t true; the number of reported collisions is roughly flat, despite a 40% increase in cycling and crowing population.
– the worst place in the city for cycling collisions is Bank St. near Billings Bridge. It is about twice as bad as the next locations (on Rideau St. and Montreal Rd).
Screen capture of a map showing pedestrian and cyclist collisions in Ottawa from 2004-2013.
Screen capture of a map showing pedestrian and cyclist collisions in Ottawa from 2004-2013, zoommed in to Stittsville Main Street.
Screen capture of a map showing pedestrian and cyclist collisions in Ottawa from 2004-2013, city-side.
Screen capture showing most of the city.

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