Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.

What would Jane Jacobs think of Stittsville Main Street?

What a gorgeous day for a walk down Stittsville Main Street.

About 40 people joined me on Saturday for Stittsville’s first-ever Jane‘s Walk.  The walk was part of a city-wide festival celebrating Jane Jacobs, a writer and activist who was well-known for her thoughts about city planning.

Jacobs passed away in 2006, and this would have been the 100th anniversary of her birth.  There were over 40 walks in Ottawa this year.

We walked in a big loop, starting at Village Square Park, walking north to Beverley.  We crossed the road and headed south all the way to the gas station, then looped back again to where we started.  We covered about 2.5 km in 90 minutes.

We talked about how the role of the street has changed over the past 150 years, and how it might look in the future. Last year the city approved a new Community Design Plan (CDP) that’s intended to be a framework for encouraging healthy development along the street.

Jacobs wrote mostly about big cities (New York, Chicago, Toronto, etc.) and probably would have viewed a Stittsville disdainfully as a “garden city”.  Still, many of her observations about healthy city design can be applied to Stittsville Main Street.

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane Jacobs’ book “The Death and LIfe of Great American Cities” was published in 1961 and continues to influence urban planning ideas. Photo by Barry Gray.

 


The people best equipped to understand urban complexity are ordinary, interested citizens.

Jacobs distrusted professional planners, believing that residents knew best about their own neighbourhoods. She also believed that the best way to study a city wasn’t through abstract statistics or maps, but to actually walk the streets and experience it first hand.

That’s what motivated me to do this walking tour. I bet there are very few people in Stittsville who have actually walked the length of Main Street!

 

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
We started at Village Square Park. Photo by Barry Gray.

 


“On successful city streets, people must appear at different times… hour by hour through the day.”

What’s the right mix of retail, office and residential?  The new CDP call for mixed use development including commercial business on the ground floor and residential and offices above. That mix is important to keep the street active and lively from morning to night, and should bring more “eyes on the street” – neighbours watching out for each other.

 

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.

 


A healthy street needs buildings of different ages and conditions, including a good proportion of old ones.

There are many older buildings, some historically significant, that not only provide visual interest but offer lower-rent spaces that attract small businesses. Hudson’s Insurance (Stittsville Main at Abbott) has heritage designation, and several others are on the City’s heritage register.

 

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.

 


Healthy streets needs a sufficiently dense concentration of people – residents, workers and visitors.

Jacobs biggest concern about the plan would probably be around population density. The CDP calls for 500 new residential units before 2031, but that may not be enough to support businesses on the street.

There’s been very little residential development in the past two decades. Only 132 residential units have been constructed since 1994 (that’s 6.6 dwellings per year). Between 2001-2014, there were an average of 1.9 dwellings per year. By comparison, the overall population of Stittsville grew by 850 from 2014-2015.

Jacobs saw population density as key to being to support smaller businesses throughout the day that help keep the street active and lively.  An extra 500 people in the next 15 years isn’t enough to sustain Stittsville Main on its own, but that may be mitigated by the rapid population growth in the surrounding communities.

 

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.

 


Jacobs described daily life on a healthy street to “…an intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole.”

One of the walkers asked a great question: What’s going to make people want to invest on the street? What makes a business owner want to start their shop in the middle of Stittsville Main, instead of in a newer building along Hazeldean Road or somewhere else?

That’s really the key question. As Ottawa writer Jonathan McLeod observed: “The city cannot force people to dance, but with the right planning, we can set the stage for a wonderful show.”

I’m planning to set up a forum in the next few months to bring people together to talk about what kind of strategy is needed to find  identify investors with not only a vision for SMS, but the economic means to develop as well.

I’ve also started a Facebook group called Friends of Stittsville Main Street where we’ll share stories, photos and updates, and hopefully some great ideas about revitalizing the street.  I hope you can join our conversation.

 

Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray
Jane's Walk 2016 on Stittsville Main Street. Photo by Barry Gray.
Photo by Barry Gray.

 

Additional sources for this story include:

A big thank you to Barry Gray for his photography at the event.


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3 thoughts on “What would Jane Jacobs think of Stittsville Main Street?”

  1. Great initiative and good story. Those of us who live in Stittsville, both newcomers and long time residents, will undoubtedly appreciate having a voice in future planning.
    Thank you Glen.

    1. Thanks for your comment Cathy. It’s great to see so many people interested in the future of Stittsville Main Street. I’ll do another walk like this again sometime.

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