Tag Archives: 173 huntmar

Richcraft gets deferral on demolition decision

The City of Ottawa’s Built Heritage Subcommittee was supposed to decide today on Richcraft’s proposal to dismantle and move the Bradley-Craig barn at 590 Huntmar, but they deferred the decision until the next meeting on December 10.

FOTENN, the consultants who represent Richcraft on the file, made the request for deferral. They agreed to extend the 90-day period in which the city has to respond to the demolition request.

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At the same meeting, the committee passed a motion to designate Boyd House at 173 Huntmar as a heritage building.  In 2013, the heritage committee held off on full designation when the owner agreed to work with city staff to incorporate it into the new development.

Barry Padolski, a committee member and prominent local architect, said that the planned subdivision will benefit from the “iconic” presence of the old stone house, and said that this was a positive outcome for planning and development, and that it would “benefit the discussion on the Bradley-Craig barn at the next meeting.”

The developer will also preserve some of the trees along the north side of the property, and a long laneway will mimic the traditional driveway that runs from Huntmar Road into the farm.

 

Miguel Tremblay, a planning consultant with FOTENN, was at the meeting to represent both Richcraft on the Bradley-Craig file, and Amazon Properties who own Boyd House.

Tremblay said his client was very much in favour of heritage designation for Boyd House, but the fact that it wasn’t originally designated in 2013 gave the developer more flexibility in designing their plans.

“We asked for flexbility [for Boyd House],” said Tremblay. “It’s the same thing we’re asking at 590 Hazeldean to work through some issues.”

The Boyd House designation still has to be approved by the city’s Planning Committee and City Council.

The plan of subdivison for 173 Huntmar incorporates Boyd House across from a large park. A row of trees on the north side of the property will be preserved and a long laneway from Huntmar to the heritage house will mimic the traditional farm driveway.
The plan of subdivison for 173 Huntmar incorporates Boyd House across from a large park. A row of trees on the north side of the property will be preserved and a long laneway from Huntmar to the heritage house will mimic the traditional farm driveway.

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Boyd House on Huntmar recommended for heritage designation

(Photo: Boyd House, Fall 2013.  Photo by Glen Gower.)

City planners are recommending that Boyd House, the old stone home at 173 Huntmar Drive, be designated as a heritage building.  The city’s Built Heritage Sub-Committee will vote on a motion to designated it on Monday, November 9.

The property is slated for development and heritage designation is included as one of the conditions in the plan of subdivision.

In 2013, the owner of the property, Bob Karam, applied to demolish the home.  The application went in front of the city’s heritage committee, at which point the owner agreed to stave off demolition and maintain and secure the property.

The stone house will now be incorporated into the new subdivison and used as an office, restaurant, or similar commercial use.

The house was built in 1887 by James and Jane Boyd, just a few years after the Great Fire destroyed most of the landscape in this area.  They raised seven children and the house remained in the family until the 1970s.

The city’s heritage staff say that architecturally, it’s a good example of a late 19th century Gothic Revival farmhouse.

“Typical of the style, the house is constructed of stone with a steeply pitched gable roof, decorative bargeboard and stone quoins. These houses were frequently built to replace earlier log houses that were built upon settlement,” says the report.

“The house has associative or historical value because it expresses the theme of early settlement of Huntley Township by Irish Protestants in the mid 19th century. These new immigrants cleared the land and farmed, and this house is representative of the early successes of prosperous farmers such as the Boyd family. As development occurs in the area, the historic context of the Boyd House is being lost. The house has contextual value as a visual reminder of the agricultural history of Huntley Township.”

Councillor Shad Qadri is quoted in the report as well:
“As Councillor for the area I feel it is very important that we retain the heritage of our community and the designation of the Boyd house provides an excellent opportunity to do so. With Stittsville as a growing community I feel it is important that we maintain our historical connection going forward to reflect the importance of the descendants of our community.”

Over the past few years the condition of the home has deteriorated and vandals have caused extensive cosmetic damage to the home.  A barn on the site built in 1901 was torn down in the fall of 2013.

A couple years ago I did quite a bit of research into the home and the Boyd family.  There’s a remarkable number of photos and stories that have been passed down through generations of the family.  You can read about it here…

James and Jane Boyd, early 1900s.
James and Jane Boyd. Photo taken in the early 1900’s. This photo was emailed to me by Jeff Linttell, a Boyd descendent who now lives in Vancleek Hill. Linttell’s grandmother was Margaret Ann Boyd, the eldest child of James and Jane. This photo was taken at 214 Percy Street, a home belonging to the Linttell family.

 

Lyman Boyd with his neice Karen Boyd and friend David MacBeth, in the early 1950s. Photo courtesy of Melodie McCullough.
Lyman Boyd with his neice Karen Boyd and friend David MacBeth, in the early 1950s. Lyman was the last of the family to live on the farm, and sold it in the 1970s. Photo courtesy of Melodie McCullough.

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NOTEBOOK: Richcraft will ask to defer barn decision; Dentists taking over antique shop

Bradley-Craig farm. Photo by Krista Woltman.
Bradley-Craig farm. Photo by Krista Woltman.

 

BRADLEY-CRAIG BARN
Richcraft is going to ask the city’s Built Heritage Sub-Committee to defer a decision on their demolition request for the Bradley-Craig barn.  The developer wants to dismantle and move the landmark building on Hazeldean Road to Saunder’s Farm in Munster, and the proposal is on the committee’s agenda for this Monday.  The committee will likely grant the deferral, and reschedule the item for December. Continue reading


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NOTEBOOK: Free ice cream & more, 6279 Fernbank, museum needs space

FREE STUFF!
Lois & Frima’s is giving away free ice cream on Saturday, October 31. It’s become an annual tradition to clear out their buckets of ice cream before going into hibernation for the winter .  They’re in the Ultrama Plaza at 1626 Stittsville Main Street, all the way in the back of the plaza. Continue reading


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Developer exasperated by vandalism to heritage home

The owner of a 19th century stone farmhouse on Huntmar Drive says he doesn’t know what else he can do to stop vandalism on his property.

Robert Karam has owned the property for nearly ten years.  The house, which dates back to 1887, has been listed on the City of Ottawa’s heritage register since the fall of 2013. (You read more about the history of the home here.)   Continue reading


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Boyd House: Family memories of Christmas on the farm, and more (Part 5)

(Above: Lyman Boyd with his niece Karen Boyd on left and friend, David MacBeth, early 1950s.)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This series on Boyd House, an old stone farmhouse on Huntmar Drive, originally appeared a year ago on OttawaStart.com.  We’re updating and republishing the original research over the next few weeks on StittsvilleCentral.ca. Photos and research by Glen Gower. This post features excerpts from emails and interviews with descendants of the Boyd family who have contacted me over the past year.  You’ll notice in the photos that the stone house features prominently in many of the pictures.  It must have been an important part of the Boyd family.

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Boyd House: The old farmhouse and barns (Part 3)

(Above: Boyd House on a December night in the early 2000’s. Archival photo.)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This series on Boyd House, an old stone farmhouse on Huntmar Drive, originally appeared a year ago on OttawaStart.com.  We’re updating and republishing the original research over the next few weeks on StittsvilleCentral.ca. Photos and research by Glen Gower.

 

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LETTER: Time for some research into the Bradley/Craig farmstead

Re: Boyd House: The old stone home at 173 Huntmar (Part 1)

Thank you for your artistic treatment (photography) of this wonderful old home and property.

I would love to see the same treatment, (before it’s too late!) for the property on Hazeldean Road, which I believe is called the Bradley/Craig farmstead. The barn behind the home is a classic!

It is across from Grant Crossing and now seeming to be so unappreciated… with bulldozers sifting soil beside it!

Thanks again,
Sincerely,
Margaret Bryan

 

Editor’s note: Photos and history of the Bradley/Craig farmstead will be coming soon! In the meantime, readers may be interested to know that the house and farm do have heritage designation.  The house is in good shape but the barn is not.


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Boyd House: The old stone home at 173 Huntmar (Part 1)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This series originally appeared a year ago on OttawaStart.com.  Over the next few weeks we’ll update and republish the research on this site. There’s currently a site plan proposal to redevelop the land at 173 Huntmar for townhomes, apartments, and commercial space.  The heritage home would be preserved. Photos and research by Glen Gower.

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