Tag Archives: poole creek

NOTEBOOK: More honours for Tysen, Poole Creek blasting, coyote meeting, more

CONGRATS TYSEN!
This week at the Spirit of the Capital Youth Awards, Stittsville’s Tysen Lefebvre received the Max Keeping Award for Personal Strength and Courage. It’s awarded annually to an individual who has demonstrated a tremendous passion for life by overcoming personal obstacles. Tysen’s goal is to raise one million dollars for Make-A-Wish. He’s over $600,000 so far. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

PHOTO: Turtle near Poole Creek

We spotted this guy (or gal?) on a path near Poole Creek on the weekend.  It's a snapping turtle, and they're a common sight in Stittsville near creeks and marshes at this time of year.  Don't get too close though - these guys won't hesitate to snap if they feel threatened.  In late May and early June, you'll start to see mother turtles burying their eggs in the sand at local playgrounds, and then the turtles hatch in September.
Photo by Glen Gower

 

We spotted this guy (or gal?) on a path near Poole Creek on the weekend.  It’s a snapping turtle, and they’re a common sight in Stittsville near creeks and marshes at this time of year.  Don’t get too close though – these guys won’t hesitate to snap if they feel threatened.  In late May and early June, you’ll start to see mother turtles burying their eggs in the sand at local playgrounds, and then the turtles hatch in September. More photos & stories about Stittsville turtles here…


SHARE THIS

NOTEBOOK: A small step to better protect our forests from development

One of my biggest complaints about suburban development is how builders often take a “bulldoze and build” approach, stripping away long-standing forests and natural areas. While there are some restrictions to prevent this, there aren’t always enough measures in the City’s policy toolkit to provide the necessary protection.

So I was really encouraged this week to see City Council unanimously approve a change to the Official Plan that should do more to proactively protect “significant woodlots” in the urban area.  Continue reading


SHARE THIS

GALLERY: Winter wonderland along Poole Creek

“I took these pictures on December 6  during my morning walk,” says Michelle Legault. “They were taken on the paths that connect Amberwood with Granite Ridge along Poole Creek.  It was really a winter wonderland after awful weather the day before.”

(We love seeing photos from in and around our community. Please send your best pics to us at feedback@stittsvillecentral.ca) Continue reading


SHARE THIS

COMMENT: Five places to enjoy the great outdoors on Thanksgiving Monday

(PHOTO: Lookout over the marsh at the head of Poole Creek, along the Trans Canada Trail just west of Stittsville.  Photo by Glen Gower.)

As I sit down to write this it’s a very crisp (1°C) but bright Thanksgiving Monday. I hope you can take some time today to get outside for a run, a walk or a bike ride and enjoy one of the many trails we have close to us in Stittsville. (Bring your camera too – the fall colours are incredible.) Here are five of my favourite paths nearby. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

Following Poole Creek, Part 3

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Poole Creek may be Stittsville’s most important natural feature. It meanders from west to north east, crossing through neighbourhoods old and new, playing a crucial role in our community’s ecology. In the final part of this series, ecologist Nick Stow follows the creek as it crosses Hazeldean Road. There, it passes through one of Stittsville’s newest neighbourhoods, where it’s in the midst of a transformation from farmland to forest. All photos by Nick Stow.)


 

PAST SWEETNAM DRIVE, POOLE CREEK CHANGES CHARACTER AGAIN. After a short run out of sight, it crosses under busy Hazeldean Road and enters one of the City’s newest neighbourhoods.  Where it once meandered through farmland, the creek nows winds between recent or still-developing subdivisions.  Deeper, clay soils have allowed the creek to carve a valley dense in places with Manitoba maple, crack willow and thorny thickets.  Following the creek becomes more difficult.  With construction still underway, the trail remains incomplete.  Good vantage points exist up and downstream of Huntmar Drive, beside one of the established subdivisions. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

Following Poole Creek, Part 2

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Poole Creek may be Stittsville’s most important natural feature. It meanders from west to north east, crossing through neighbourhoods old and new, playing a crucial role in our community’s ecology. In the second part of this series, ecologist Nick Stow follows the creek as it heads east of Stittsville Main Street, entering a stretch that remains largely unsurveyed and uninventoried. All photos by Nick Stow.)


JUST EAST OF MAIN STREET, POOLE CREEK TURNS NORTH AND DISAPPEARS into a large remnant of Stittsville’s once extensive wetlands.  Almost inaccessible, the wetland remains largely unsurveyed and uninventoried.  However, I suspect that an bioinventory would likely reveal several species at risk, especially Blanding’s turtle, which is known from the Goulbourn Wetland Complex and several isolated observations elsewhere in the village. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

Following Poole Creek, Part 1

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Poole Creek may be Stittsville’s most important natural feature. It meanders from the Trans Canada Trail to the Carp River, crossing through neighbourhoods old and new, playing a crucial role in our community’s ecology. In this series, ecologist Nick Stow follows the creek from start to finish, looking at how it changes as it travels through wetlands, forests and new subdivisions. All photos by Nick Stow.)

I’M CROUCHED LOW, SLOWLY CREEPING THROUGH YOUNG FERNS AND CEDARS TOWARD A SHADED POOL, where my instincts tell me a brown trout should be resting.  Sunlight and reflections dapple the surface of the water.  In the shadow of the bank, the sandy, leaf-littered creek bottom looks bronze.  Freezing against a tree trunk, I concentrate on the patches of bronze, looking for movement.  After a few seconds, I can make out the shape, then the speckled, grey back and splash of gold on the sides, holding near the bottom.  Perhaps 14 inches long, and just over a pound.  I raise my camera, and try to slide surreptitiously into a better position.  With a quick flip of its tail, the fish is gone.

Continue reading


SHARE THIS

VIDEO: Aerial footage of the Upper Poole Creek Wetland

Here’s a mesmerizing video shared by Twitch, taken on Saturday high above the Upper Poole Creek Wetland at the observation deck on the Trans Canada Trail.

It’s long – over 13 minutes – but it’s a fascinating look at the wetland from a perspective the area. Most of the wetland is far from roads or paths and on private property, so this video gives a unique view. The video starts with a flight heading north west from the Trans Canada Trail towards Hazeldean Road. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

Comments of the week: Election candidates, wetlands, cycling safety, more…

Every week we get lots of comments from our readers on our web site, via email, and social media.  Here’s a sample of what we heard this week.  Add your thoughts to the comments at the bottom of this article or email feedback@stittsvillecentral.ca.

Continue reading


SHARE THIS

LETTER: Municipalities value development over environment

Re: Residents question health of Poole Creek Wetland

Thanks to Stittsville Central for the in-depth article on what happens when municipalities place more value on bad development than environmental sustainability.  And, for showing that local residents can make a difference in standing up for the community’s best interests.
Continue reading


SHARE THIS

Residents question health of Poole Creek wetland

(Above: Stittsville residents are concerned about the health of the Upper Poole Creek Wetland.  From left to right: Marcos Alvarez, Jonah Alvarez, Andrea Sedgwick, Ken McRae, Sylvie Sabourin, Mila (last name unknown). Photo via Ken McRae, October 2014.)

The Upper Poole Creek wetland is one of Stittsville’s greatest natural features. So many of us walk our dogs, jog, cycle or otherwise explore the Trans Canada Trail, and stop at the observation deck to look out over the marsh.

Sometimes you’ll see turtles, small fish, frogs, birds. It’s about a kilometre west of suburban boundary of Stittsville, and some of the best views are at sunrise and sunset. Continue reading


SHARE THIS

City staff want conversation with culvert blockers

(PHOTO: Stones blocking the culvert under the Trans Canada Trail, October 2014.  Photo courtesy of Phil Sweetnam.)

City officials want to know who keeps plugging up a culvert under the Trans Canada Trail, and why they’re doing it.

“We initially thought it was just kids throwing stones in,” says John Kukalis, Manager of Surface Water Management for the City. “Somebody keeps going back in there and blocking the culverts up with stones and trying to create an impoundment of water.” Continue reading


SHARE THIS